Get wet into the Secluded beaches Caribbean

Indulge into the fun of the secluded beaches Caribbean. And spend a memorable time there.

Turks and Caicos

Known for its amazing coral reefs and fascinating wildlife, Turks and Caicos is the ideal destination for the avid scuba diver or birdwatcher. The island’s crystal-clear waters will also not disappoint those who enjoy snorkeling, surfing and swimming, and visitors will find plenty to do ashore, from sunbathing to shopping.

Anguilla

Surrounded by turquoise waters, Anguilla offer a tranquil retreat of more than 30 beaches, seven marine parks and numerous diving sites where you can explore shipwrecks, caves and marine life. The atmosphere is laid-back and friendly, the beaches warm and the water dazzling at this Caribbean getaway.

Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands

Grand Cayman is known as a scuba diving paradise with more than 130 dive sites surrounding the island, including its most famous one, Stingray City. Deep-sea fishermen enjoy the island’s “national sport,” and the coral reefs can be explored in many ways. The island also contains one of the Caribbean’s best strands of sand, 7 Mile Beach.

Ref: http://www.tripadvisor.com/Inspiration-g147237-c1-Caribbean.html

British Virgin Islands

British Virgin Islanders could drape the terminal at Beef Island Airport in a giant banner that reads, “Welcome to the Sailing Capital of the World”—although they’d never actually do anything so crass. But that’s essentially what the BVI has become over the past 30 years: the globe’s number-one spot for summer (and honeymoon) sailors.

Best for: Couples who want to learn the basics of sailing and spend their nights at a private-island resort. Or newlyweds with enough experience beneath the mast to sail off on their own bareboat charter honeymoon.

Not for: Anyone who prefers the self-serve piña colada machines and 24/7 party scene at a mega-resort. These islands are really for those who want peace and quiet with their tropical paradise.

Highlight: Spending a day alone on Anegada, a coral atoll, where there’s always an empty beach and an offshore wreck waiting to be explored by scuba divers or snorkelers.

Sweet Dreams: The BVI is famous for posh resorts. But one of the archipelago’s most romantic digs is the almost legendary Sandcastle Hotel, on secluded Jost Van Dyke island. This is the Caribbean straight out of Jimmy Buffett—hammocks strung between coconut palms, cool breezes and cold beer, cottages draped in bougainvillea and hibiscus, and a bar packed with people from all around the world telling seafaring yarns (sandcastle-bvi.com; 284-495-9888). Want that super-indulgent, posh resort experience? BVI also has a half-dozen private-island resorts, including the renowned Peter Island (peterisland.com; 800-346-4451).

5. Cayman Islands

The islands that make up the Cayman Islands (Grand Cayman, Little Cayman and Cayman Brac) are surrounded by gorgeous, clear water, making them a diving hot spot. They also have a culture of politesse, which makes visitors feel safe and at home.

Best for: Couples who appreciate high-end resorts and the high-stakes adventure of wall diving.

Not for: Those who want to explore local villages for exotic cultural experiences. The Caymans have an American standard (and style) of living.

Highlight: Scuba divers love the Sunken City of Atlantis, where a local artist is constructing a below-the-surface city with sculptures cast from rock, sand and cement—all of which are fostering the growth of a brand-new reef (800-594-0843; bracreef.com/dive_atlantis.html).

Sweet Dreams: The Ritz-Carlton, Grand Cayman opened in December on Grand Cayman’s famous Seven-Mile Beach. It has a La Prairie spa, a Greg Norman golf course and a restaurant overseen by the chef of Le Bernardin, the New York City French food palace. Rooms have private terraces, and there are also secluded oceanfront condos (ritzcarlton.com; 345-943-9000). A more moderately priced choice are the accommodations at the Rocky Shore Villas. It has charming rooms—some in private cottages—and offers classes on traditional island cooking and fishing (866-845-6945; getaway.ky).

6. Barbados

Locals are proud that Barbados retains more British flavor than any other Caribbean landfall: Afternoon tea, driving on the left and cricket are a few of the customs the Brits left behind. And unlike islands where traditions are fading, Bajans (as the islanders call themselves) embrace these customs as part of their national character.

Best for: Pretending that you’re in a tropical England. Dig into a champagne-and-caviar picnic while watching a match at the Barbados Polo Club (246-432-1802), or attend a garden party hosted by the Barbados Horticulture Society (246-428-5889).

Not for: Spring-break party scenes. The club-and-café area around the Careenage yacht basin in downtown Bridgetown can get pretty rowdy on weekends, but this isn’t a place for party animals.

Highlight: Walking hand-in-hand down the wildly romantic Bathsheba Beach, knowing that a young Queen Elizabeth II once strolled here, too.

Sweet Dreams: With a recent $200 million ultra-extreme makeover, the legendary Sandy Lane is back among the Caribbean’s best hotels. From the palatial guest rooms and luxury spa to the 18-hole golf course, everything has been upgraded and outfitted with the best that money can buy. And they really do treat you like royalty (246-444-2000; sandylane.com). The St. Lawrence Gap area is full of less-expensive alternatives, including the nifty little Southern Palms Beach Club, which features brightly decorated rooms along a lovely beach (southernpalms.net; 246-428-7171).

Ref: http://www.bridalguide.com/honeymoons/caribbean/22-top-caribbean-honeymoon-spots

As you have the details now get ready to have fun at the secluded beaches Caribbean.

You may also like: Best Secluded Beaches

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